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YearIssue
Issue 02, 2017

Contents:

This issue is proofread by Cheng Long and Terry Boyd-Zhang.
Introduction to Our Cover

Although the man in the photo dressed like a miner, he is actually a caver exploring an ancient mine, a man-made “karst cave”that can be dated back to the Tang Dynasty more than 2000 years ago, in Dexing, a city famous for its abundant resource of metal ores and a long history of mining. In recent years, China’s professional caving has developed fast — those natural caves, one after another, were More>>

Chinese New Style: A Time For Exploring

From the Editor

Chinese New Style: A Time For Exploring

By Liu Jing, Editor in Chief
Photograph by Li Jin

Flocks of Chinese people in shopping malls? Crowds lining up at the scenic spots? Those are outmoded images about Chinese people around the world. Now, it is time to change your view. Two teams of cavers from Guangxi and Chongqing provinces in China explored an abandoned silver mine in Dexing City, Jiangxi last year. Before this, these two teams finished several caving explorations in China’s famMore>>

Be Like Water

Idioms

Be Like Water

By Cheng Long
Photograph by Wang Tianrui

When working on his Science and Civilization of China, Joseph Needham noticed that water and rivers have run right through Chinese history, thought, its land, life and culture as the blood-stream of its existence and survival. From the earliest times to the present, as Joseph Needham traced it, man’s ingenuity has been forged to invent ways to harness the rivers for the benefit of life. For examplMore>>

Explore Subterranean Labyrinth  of Silver and Gold--The Anicent Mines of Dexing

Feature

Explore Subterranean Labyrinth of Silver and Gold--The Anicent Mines of Dexing

By Tang Huiyu
Photographs by Li Jin, and as credited
Illustrations by Fu Dawei, and as credited

The hilly northeastern Jiangxi Province is known for its abundance of metal ore mines. Large-scale extraction of gold and silver started here as early as the beginning of the Tang Dynasty (618–907AD), and when the ore beds became exhausted, the mine shafts and caves were left abandoned, remaining forgotten for centuries, until two teams of cavers arrived from Guangxi and Chongqing to explore an abMore>>

Discover Spectacular Legacy of  Zhejiang Stonecutters

Feature

Discover Spectacular Legacy of Zhejiang Stonecutters

By Qian Guodan
Photographs by Ye Wenlong, and as credited

The province of Zhejiang is one of the strongholds of stone quarrying in China. Stone quarries have been operational here for three millennia and this industry has left its marks everywhere in the province, both on the coast and inland. The early quarries have long since become remarkable, majestic sites — looming, foreboding grottoes, sheer rock faces and water pools, of infinite variety More>>

Zhongshan: The Lost State ofthe Warring States Period

History

Zhongshan: The Lost State ofthe Warring States Period

By Gu Demao
Images provided by Zhang Hui, and as credited
Photographs by Ya Ning, and as credited
Translation by Nick Angiers

The State of Zhongshan, a vassal state established by the nomadic Xianyu people, existed from 414 BC to 296 BC, during which time it strove for domination alongside the most powerful states of the time. For many years, all we knew about Zhongshan was what we had learned from scattered unofficial historical records. Then, after having been submerged in slumber for over 2000 years, the capital of ZhMore>>

Where Have the Chinese Leopards Gone?

Wildlife

Where Have the Chinese Leopards Gone?

By Yu Muwen
Photographs by Chinese Felid Conservation Alliance, and as credited
Translation by Trevor Padgett

Leopards, sleek and beautiful predators that once roamed freely and plentifully throughout China’s wilderness, are gone. Sometime in the mid 1960s, according to many zoologists, China lost its last remaining leopard. Or so we thought. The truth is, however, quite the opposite: though dauntingly secretive, these felines have found a way to survive in the recesses of China’s more wild and forgMore>>

Huangyao:A Millennial  Ancient Town  in Karst Mountains

Destination

Huangyao:A Millennial Ancient Town in Karst Mountains

By Qin Nina
Translation by Nick Angiers

Among the verdant mountains found throughout the karst landscapes of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, there is a secluded town which has stood for thousands of years. It is not nearly as eminent as the ancient towns and villages of the Jiangnan region (south of the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River), nor does it stand out as much as those of Sichuan Province; it is instead like a piecMore>>

Traditional Chinese Comb: Small Objects with Great Implications

Collection

Traditional Chinese Comb: Small Objects with Great Implications

By Huang Jinsui
Photographs by Dong Maiying, and as credited
Translation by Paul Stephen

The comb: this small, unassuming object has existed in China for millennia, gradually evolving from a simple hair-straightening tool into an item entrusted with new meanings and identities, eventually becoming an important component of China’s traditional cultural heritage. More>>

Medicated Congee: More than Just a Delicacy

Taste

Medicated Congee: More than Just a Delicacy

By Hengshan Moda
Translation by Nick Angiers

Medicated congee is one of the typical Chinese medicated foods, combining the experience and wisdom of both traditional Chinese medicine and cuisine. By simply washing some round-grain rice, choosing some herbs, and slowly cooking them together in a pot, a delicacy that both satisfied hunger and cured ailments could be created.More>>

“Beaten” Patterns

Chinese Patterns

“Beaten” Patterns

By Shen Wen
Translation by Paul Stephen

The prehistoric art of pottery originated from both the practical needs of life, and from an essential truth that far went beyond pure survival. The act of beating first emerged as an unremarkable action during ancient peoples’ labor work. These people could not have known that this simple action would go on to influence classical decorative motifs for generations thousands of years later.More>>